Do you ever get tired of reading pseudo-Medieval Fantasy novels? If so, you might want try this week’s recommendation – a story set in Euterpe, a magical version of 18th century Europe. “Goblin Moon” by Teresa Edgerton is Volume One of the “Mask and Dagger” duology. Copies of the 1991 paperback, and its sequel “The Gnome’s Engine”, are quite scarce but thankfully both novels are now available as ebooks. In this new edition, “The Gnome’s Engine” has been renamed “Hobgoblin Night”. These novels are set in a world in which humans, dwarfs and gnomes have lived peacefully together since the fall of two opposing empires. However, there are other races, such as fairies, trolls and goblins, which can be more dangerous to humans….

“Goblin Moon” tells the story of three interlocked families who live in the city of Thornburg. Caleb Braun and his grand-nephew, Jed, are boatmen who scavenge the tidal river Lunn. Young Jed hates this trade and Caleb used to be a high-ranking servant in a nobleman’s house. One night they recover a coffin which proves to contain the strangely well-preserved body of a sorcerer and some spell-books. They take it to Caleb’s old master, the bookseller Gottfried Jenk, a nobleman reduced to poverty by his obsessive study of alchemy and his search for the mystical stone Seramarias. The only other thing that Jenk cares about is his eighteen year-old granddaughter Seramarias (Sera). She has been sent to live with her wealthy relations the Vorders to act as a companion to their delicate daughter, Elsie. Jed has grown up thinking of “obstinate, headstrong” Sera as a sister. He bashfully adores the beautiful Elsie but she is being courted by the handsome Jarl Skogsra, a friend of her godmother, the Duchess of Zar-Wildungen.

The sorcerer’s books reignite Jenk’s passion for magical research and he and Caleb embark on a secret project to create an homunculus, a miniature living being. Jenk wants to sell the homunculus to fund his search for the Stone Seramarias but Caleb has other ideas. Meanwhile, Jed has gone to work for a kindly dwarf who belongs to the Glassmakers Guild. Caleb warns his great-nephew that the Glassmakers still “remember the magic and the mystery at the heart” of their secret ceremonies. One of  the Guild’s more unusual members is Imbrian nobleman, Francis, Lord Skelbrooke, who is famed as a poet and dandy. Skelbrooke is said to be the exquisite Duchess of Zar-Wildungen’s latest lover but he seems curiously interested in independent-minded Sera.

Sera has too many problems to pay much attention to how she feels about Lord Skelbrooke. The health of her beloved cousin is failing and the bizarre treatments which Elsie’s mother insists on only make Elsie worse. Jarl Skogsra has increasing influence over Elsie but something about their relationship seems wrong to Sera. Sinister things happen and Sera begins to fear that there is a plot against Elsie. The one person who might be able to help the cousins is Lord Skelbrooke but he has a hidden agenda of his own and a talent for making dangerous enemies. Can he arrive in time to help Sera save Elsie from a cruel fate?

Don’t let the mention of goblins and gnomes fool you into thinking that this is a children’s book. “Goblin Moon” is a dark-hued story for adult readers. It has one of the creepiest openings in Fantasy fiction and the civilised delights of polite society in Thornburg are contrasted with a seamier underworld.  The book is full of memorable scenes. At a fashionable funeral the mourners are served a delicious picnic by footmen in the graveyard but the “deceased” is too busy to attend. At an equally unusual wedding, an aristocratic young woman marries a criminal just before he is executed. During the wedding banquet the groom is represented by a wax effigy with “a tastefully arranged hempen noose around his neck”. This isn’t battle-heavy Heroic Fantasy but there is no shortage of action and excitement since the intricate plot has room for a reanimated corpse, vampires, witches, evil magicians, brutal trolls, marauding hobgoblins, vengeful Fees (fairies), serial killers, people-traffickers and pirates.

Edgerton is an underrated writer. If you haven’t heard of her it is probably because her career hasn’t been nurtured by commercial publishers as it should have been. In my view Edgerton is one of the best `world-makers’ in modern Fantasy. Her novels are set in a variety of superbly detailed worlds, including one with a basis in a Welsh myth (see her “Green Lion” trilogy). The “Mask and Dagger” books feature unique versions of several European cultures and, in Volume Two, of 18th century America. Edgerton is particularly strong on creating cities and towns with distinctive history, architecture and atmosphere. She is also wonderful at describing the food, furnishings and fashions of the late 18th century. If I was drawing up a list of Best Dressed Fantasy Characters, “Mask and Dagger” would be second only to E.R.Eddison’s “Worm Ouroboros” (see my post of February 2014). Who could resist the Duchess of Zar-Wildungen “splendid in diamonds and heliotrope satin, and a cartwheel-sized hat loaded with plumes enough to outfit an army of ostriches”?

I’m also impressed by the beliefs, customs and rituals which feature in “Goblin Moon”. They suggest that Edgerton has a sound knowledge of the history of Magic and Alchemy and of the new philosophies and religions which sprang up during the Enlightenment. For example, the secret rituals of the Glassblowers Guild are based on the kind of Masonic initiation rites that Mozart portrayed in his “Magic Flute” (one of my favourite operas), while Lord Skelbrooke hunts down the murderous Knights of Mezztopholeez – a version of the Hellfire Club who notoriously dabbled in the demonic. The dainty female homunculus “born” in Jenk’s bookshop is eerily convincing and the fall of the island-based empires (which adds an Atlantis plot-line to the series) is celebrated by tossing two wickerwork giants into the river Lunn. Worship in the cathedral centres on the Father, the Seven Fates, or planetary intelligences, and the Nine Powers, or seasons. This adds another dimension to some of the novel’s characters. Sera hopes for a “sober and sensible existence” free of superstition and magic but beautiful images of the Fates and Powers never fail to inspire her “to higher and better thoughts”.

Two other features which make this novel particularly enjoyable are the romantic element of the plot and a fascinating villainess. I’m guessing that Edgerton admires the great Romantic and Mystery novelist, Georgette Heyer and that the “Mask and Dagger” stories are influenced by some of the novels which Heyer set in the late 18th century, such as “Powder and Patch”. Dashing master of disguises, Lord Skelbrooke, who rescues Sera from social embarrassment at a ball, is the perfect Heyer-hero. The other members of the central quartet, Sera, Jed and Elsie are all appealing characters. Sera is a rational young woman in denial about her latent powers, loyal Jed is a young man discovering his own potential and though Elsie is mainly a helpless victim in “Goblin Moon” she comes into her own in “Hobgoblin Night”.

Then there is the striking figure of Marella, the tiny Duchess of Zar-Wildungen, with her gorgeous clothes and her indigo ape who may, or may not, be only a pet. Marella is a rare human-fairy hybrid, compelled by strong loves and hates – it’s a real shock when you suddenly realize which Fairy Tale motif Edgerton is using to power her plot. The Duchess’s motives remain intriguing and her actions unpredictable right up to the end of the second book. She is reason enough in herself to recommend this novel. Until next time…

Geraldine

http://www.chalcedon.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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